The 2014 Renewable Energy Case Competition  

The Ross Energy Club hosted the sixth annual Renewable Energy Case Competition (RECC), a traditional case competition1 that took place at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business on December 4 & 5, 2014.

Nineteen MBA teams from the national and international top business schools competed to devise go-to-market strategies for behind-the-meter and grid-scale solutions for the battery storage. The title sponsor was General Electric. The results were as follows: 

1st place - Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan
2nd place - Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
3rd place - Duke University's Fuqua School of Business
4th place - UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina
 

 

The 2013-2014 Renewable Energy Case Competition  

The Ross Energy Club hosted the fifth annual Renewable Energy Case Competition (RECC), a traditional case competition1 that took place at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business on December 5 & 6, 2013.

Twenty MBA teams from the nation’s top business schools competed to solve a challenging case pertaining to real-time issues facing the title sponsor, Sun Edison, a global solar power entity. The results were as follows: 

1st place -  Yale School of Management
2nd place - Cornell, Johnson School of Business
3rd place - Berkeley, Haas Business School
 
 

The 2013 Renewable Energy Case Competition  

The Ross Energy Club hosted the fourth annual Renewable Energy Case Competition (RECC), a traditional case competition1 that took place at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business on Thursday and Friday, February 31st and January 1st, 2013. 

Sixteen MBA teams from the nation’s top business schools competed to solve a challenging case pertaining to real-time issues facing the title sponsor, Sun Edison, a global solar power entity. The results for 2013 were as follows: 

1st place - Cornell (Johnson)
2nd place - Michigan (Ross)
3rd place - Dartmouth (Tuck)
4th place - University of California - Los Angeles (Anderson)

 

The 2012 Renewable Energy Case Competition  

The Ross Energy Club hosted the third annual Renewable Energy Case Competition (RECC), a traditional case competition1 that took place at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business on Thursday and Friday, February 2nd and 3rd, 2012. 

Sixteen MBA teams from the nation’s top business schools competed to solve a challenging case pertaining to real-time issues facing the title sponsor, DTEEnergy, a leading U.S. utility. The results for 2012 were as follows: 

1st place - University of California - Berkeley (Haas)
2nd place - Columbia Business School
3rd place - Duke University (Fuqua)
 

The 2011 Renewable Energy Case Competition  

The second annual RECC took place  on Thursday and Friday, January 27th and 28th, 2011. 

Fourteen MBA teams from the nation’s top business schools competed to solve a challenging case pertaining to real-time issues facing the title sponsor, Duke Energy, a leading U.S. utility. The results for 2011 were as follows:

1st place - University of Texas at Austin (McCombs)
2nd place - UCLA (Anderson)
3rd place - Duke University (Fuqua)
 

 

The 2010 Renewable Energy Case Competition  

The Ross Energy Club hosted the first annual Renewable Energy Case Competition (RECC) at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business on Thursday and Friday, January 28th and 29th, 2010.  

Twelve MBA teams from the nation’s top business schools competed to solve one of the many challenges facing the renewable energy industry. The case was written by Acciona Energy, a global leader in renewable energy solutions, and pertained to real-time important issues. Disciplines in finance, strategy, and marketing were required to effectively analyze the case. 

The top honors, and cash prize went to a very well-prepared and highly polished UCLA (Anderson) team, while the University of Texas (McCombs) took second, and Columbia finished in third. 

 

1 A case competition is the most common form of competition for MBAs in a particular discipline.  The intended goal of a case competition is to put students in a simulated business environment facing a challenging problem or objective.  In general, students are given a "case," similar to the cases used at business schools all across the country.  Students have a specified period of time to digest the case, do additional research, and prepare some sort of strategy, plan, financial spreadsheet, presentation, or some other prescribed deliverable.  Students then must present and defend their deliverable in front of a panel of judges.  The winning teams at these competitions stand to benefit monetarily, winning between a few hundred dollars to tens of thousands depending on the competition.